Charlottesville opens up housing support applications

A housing plan adopted by the Charlottesville City Council in March 2021 called for a shift in the way the city funded programs to build, preserve, and maintain units that are guaranteed to be sold or rented below the market value.

“The Affordable Housing Plan recommends that the City make a strong and recurring financial commitment to address housing needs in Charlottesville in order to (1) increase the number of subsidized affordable homes by 1,100 homes (on top of an existing 1,630 actively subsidized homes), (2) preserve 600 existing subsidized affordable homes, and (3) stabilize 1,800 to 2,200 owner and renter households facing housing instability,” reads an application for non-profit groups seeking funding for Housing Operations and Program Support. 

In mid-October the city’s office of Community Solutions announced future funds would be available through four separate pools.

One of them is $575,000 made available to nonprofit organizations under the Housing Operations and Program Support category. This used to be under the city’s Vibrant Communities Fund. (read the FY23 report)

“This competitive application process is open to not-for-profit organizations that engage in affordable housing related activities that may be requesting operational or program type funding. Organizations must have substantial presence in the City of Charlottesville and engage in affordable housing activities within the City limits. Funding will not be guaranteed.”

Examples of groups that are funded through this process range from the Albemarle Housing Improvement Program to Shelter for Help in Emergency. 

Applications are due on December 30, 2022. 

In early November, the city issued a notice of funding for major construction projects similar to the ones currently under construction at Friendship Court and at South First Street.  That application round closed on November 30.

A list of eligible groups from the application 

Before you go: The time to write and research of this article is covered by paid subscribers to Charlottesville Community Engagement. In fact, this particular installment comes from the December 2, 2022 edition of the program. To ensure this research can be sustained, please consider becoming a paid subscriber or contributing monthly through Patreon.

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